About the Author – Part 1

Real Life Stuff

My name is Philip Friel, full name Philip Noel Friel, although I prefer to be called Phil. I was born on 7th December, 1960, in the city of Derry, in Northern Ireland, where I’ve lived my entire life.

I’m the eldest of five children, and I have three other brothers (Gary, Paul and Sean) and one sister (Sandra). Both my parents are dead, my mother (Mary) in July 1975, and my father (also Phil) in December 1991. All of my grandparents are dead, my paternal grandparents within a three week period at the end of 1972 and start of 1973, and my maternal grandparents a couple of years apart in the early-1990’s.

I spent the earliest years of my life living in and around the Bogside area, firstly at Wells Street (beside the Long Tower Chapel), then at Rossville Street, and then at Ann Street, which is right on the original site upon which now exists Glenfada Park and Columcille Court, both of which featured so prominently in the infamous “Bloody Sunday” tragedy. The surge of urban renewal and development in the area during the mid-1960’s which led to these changes, saw my family relocated in 1966 to Shantallow, a newly developed council estate a few miles outside the city centre, where I spent the next twenty years of my life. At Christmas 1985 we moved again, this time to the Glen Estate, just off the Northland Road, where I still live with my brother Gary, who is severely disabled, both mentally and physically. I’m not only his “big brother” but also his principal Carer.

My first school was St. Eugene’s Primary School, Francis Street, where I spent only a few months during 1964-65, before our relocation to Shantallow, after which I began attending St. Patrick’s Boy’s School, Pennyburn. In September 1972, I started attending St. Columb’s College, Bishop’s Street, and two years later I moved to the newer school on the Buncrana Road. I left St. Columb’s College in June 1979, after attaining a total of sixteen “O-Levels” and three “A-Levels”.

In September 1979, I started attending the New University of Ulster, Coleraine, where I spent the next four years until I graduated in the summer of 1983 with a B.A. Honours Degree in History and a Diploma in Education. But despite leaving university as a qualified teacher, I quickly gave up my teaching job to concentrate on my career as a DJ, which I’d started several years previously. I’ve been a DJ for the past thirty years, and enjoyed every moment of it. Much better fun than teaching.

I was also helping out with looking after my brother, and from the middle of my second year at university, I also started caring for my father, who had begun experiencing bad health himself. That was only to continue and get progressively worse, until the start of December 1991, when my father finally passed away, and I took over as full-time carer for my brother.

I’m not married (and remain a long-term single bloke), but way back when (starting almost 30 years ago), I had a long-term relationship (six years, from age 26-32) with my ex-girlfriend. Our son Philip was born on 12th July, 1991, and was the focal point around which my entire life revolved, until his tragic death on 19th April, 2006, after many months battling cancer. This awful tragedy has had, by far, the greatest impact upon me of any event in my entire life, and I’m still trying (mostly without success) to cope with and accept this terrible loss, seven years after his death.

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “About the Author – Part 1

  1. Hello Phil.

    I was given your name by Brett Easterbrook who suggested that I contact you.

    I am the editor of the Diary of Doctor Who Role-Playing Games (DDWRPG) fanzine which charts the history and background of Doctor Who role-playing games. One of the items that we are trying to track down are copies of the fanzine Apocrypha (specifically issues #3-A and #3-B, as we have issues #1 and 2). We are unable to track those issues down and are hoping to find them (or scans or photocpies of them) as the fanzine had a good deal of information on the Time Lord Doctor Who RPG in them. As you can see by issues #19 and #20 of our fanzine (which can be found here: http://homepages.bw.edu/~jcurtis/modules.htm ) we try to give history and information about various fanzines.

    Any help or assistance in tracking down Apocrypha Issues # 3-A and #3-B would be an amazing help and well appreciated from a historical viewpoint.

    Thank you for any help that you can provide. Feel free to contact me offline at seidler [at] msoe.edu.

    Best wishes,

    -Nick

  2. Hello Nick,

    You might be in luck, although I’m not 100% certain (I haven’t checked my zine collection in donkeys ages). My zines are stored away in boxes, and due to a nasty fall on Halloween night, I’m a bit busted up (broken shoulder, bruised ribs), so I can’t get at them right now. But if you can hang on a week or two till I heal up enough to start lugging around heavy boxes, I’ll check it out for you.

    I know for sure that I have APOCRYPHA #’s 1 and 2, as well as #’s 1 & 2 of its sister publication, the A4 zine NEUTRON FLOW. My memory is very hazy, so I can’t be sure, but I’ve been looking at an old file on my computer containing a list of the Doctor Who zines in my possession (badly needs updating), and it states that I have APOCRYPHA #’s 1-3. If that’s accurate, you’re in luck.

    I’ll email you if I find #3 parts A and B, and we’ll get around to sending you copies.

    I’m also trying to hunt down some older zines. In particular, I’d really like copies of CIRCUS #’s 5, 6 and 7. If you have any idea where I can get copies, I’d be grateful.

    I’ll get back to you as soon as I can.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s